Abstract

A stigma — originally a branding-iron mark on a prisoner or slave — serves as a mark of disgrace. To carry the stigma of a bankruptcy, an HIV infection, an addiction, a reviled religion, or another negatively stereotyped social group is to be dishonored, disapproved, or even dehumanized by others.

For those scarred by a stigma, note Cynthia S. Wang, Jennifer A. Whitson, Eric R. Anicich, Laura J. Kray, and APS Fellow Adam D. Galinsky (2017), the psychological effects may be either overt or covert. A possible overt result is discrimination: Those stigmatized are often avoided, not hired, unloved. A possible covert result is internalization of the stereotypes and slurs: Women may lose their motivation to lead others; the elderly may presume they are too slow for the demands of work; gay youth may harbor suicidal thoughts.

Authors
C.S. Wang, J.A. Whitson, E.M. Anicich, L.J. Kray, and Adam Galinsky
Format
Journal Article
Publication Date
Journal
Current Directions in Psychological Science

Full Citation

Wang, C.S., J.A. Whitson, E.M. Anicich, L.J. Kray, and Adam Galinsky
. “Challenge your stigma: How to re-frame and re-value negative stereotypes and slurs.”
Current Directions in Psychological Science
vol.
26
, (January 01, 2017):
75
-
80
.