Abstract

Purpose — This chapter provides a framework that captures the fundamental impacts of power at the individual, dyadic, small group, and organizational levels. Within each level, we trace the psychological, cognitive, and behavioral consequences of having or lacking power.

Approach — We integrate theoretical approaches from psychology, sociology, behavioral economics, and organizational theory to underscore the far-reaching effects that power has.

Findings — We review theoretical and empirical evidence that demonstrate that (a) power leads people to take action, increases their general sense of control, and shapes the way they construe the world; (b) power anesthetizes people to other people's emotions and immunizes them from the pressures of conformity; and (c) power differences within groups may facilitate group functioning by creating order, reducing conflict, and facilitating coordination. In addition to providing a framework for existing research on power, we also provide three research directions in hope of generating fruitful future research.

Originality/value — Through a careful review of the literature, we demonstrate that power helps people know who does what, when, and how.

Authors
Adam Galinsky, E. Chou, N. Halevy, and G. van Kleef
Format
Chapter
Publication Date
Book
Pushing the Boundaries: Multiteam Systems in Research and Practice. Vol. 15, Research on Managing Groups and Teams

Full Citation

Galinsky, Adam, E. Chou, N. Halevy, and G. van Kleef
. “The far-reaching effects of power: At the individual, dyadic, and group levels.” In
Pushing the Boundaries: Multiteam Systems in Research and Practice. Vol. 15, Research on Managing Groups and Teams
, edited by
Margaret A. Neale and Elizabeth A. Mannix
,
81
-
113
.
Bingley
:
Emerald
, 2012.