Abstract

Two experiments explored the hypothesis that the impact of activating gender stereotypes on negotiated agreements in mixed-gender negotiations depends on the manner in which the stereotype is activated (explicitly vs. implicitly) and the content of the stereotype (linking negotiation performance to stereotypically male vs. stereotypically female traits). Specifically, two experiments investigated the generality and limits of stereotype reactance. The results of Experiment 1 suggest that negotiated outcomes become more one-sided in favor of the high power negotiator when masculine traits are explicitly linked to negotiator effectiveness. In contrast, the results of Experiment 2 suggest that negotiated outcomes are more integrative (win-win) when feminine traits are explicitly linked to negotiator effectiveness. In total, performance in mixed-gender negotiations is strongly affected by the cognitions and motivations that negotiators bring to the bargaining table.

Authors
L. Kray, J. Reb, Adam Galinsky, and Leigh Thompson
Format
Journal Article
Publication Date
Journal
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

Full Citation

Kray, L., J. Reb, Adam Galinsky, and Leigh Thompson
. “Stereotype reactance at the bargaining table: The effect of stereotype activation and power on claiming and creating value.”
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
vol.
30
, (April 01, 2004):
399
-
411
.