Abstract

The current research explored whether perspective-taking increases willingness to engage in contact with stereotyped outgroup members. Across three studies, we find that perspective-taking increases willingness to engage in contact with negatively-stereotyped targets. In Study 1, perspective-takers sat closer to, whereas stereotype suppressors sat further from, a hooligan compared to control participants. In Study 2, individual differences in perspective-taking tendencies predicted individuals' willingness to engage in contact with a hooligan, having effects above and beyond those of empathic concern. Finally, Study 3 demonstrated that perspective-taking's effects on intergroup contact extend to the target's group (i.e., another homeless man), but not to other outgroups (i.e., a man of African descent). Consistent with other perspective-taking research, our findings show that perspective-taking facilitates the creation of social bonds by increasing contact with stereotyped outgroup members.
Authors
C.S. Wang, K. Tai, G. Ku, and Adam Galinsky
Format
Journal Article
Publication Date
Journal
<a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0085681">PLOS ONE</a>

Full Citation

Wang, C.S., K. Tai, G. Ku, and Adam Galinsky
. “Perspective-taking increases willingness to engage in intergroup contact.”
<a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0085681">PLOS ONE</a>
vol.
9
, (January 01, 2014):
e85681
.