June ’22

June 8 — ReEntry Acceleration Program (REAP)/DOHMH Healthcare Employer Event
Hosted in partnership with the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), this event brought together employers, potential employers, reentry organizations, and professionals to share their efforts and learnings in successfully developing and hiring system-impacted individuals for career-track employment in NYC healthcare settings. This event was aimed at developing strategies to improve hiring opportunities in the NYC healthcare sector for people with past criminal records. 
Organized by the center and NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH).
June 1 — SESF Virtual Check-in Meeting
Ivy Hatsengate hosted monthly virtual check-in meetings with the 2022 summer fellows cohort as a way to create a community for fellows to connect and learn about their peer’s summer projects, and to discuss best practices for working remotely and/or in hybrid working environments. 

May ’22

May 4, 11, & 13 — SESF Orientations
Cross-campus recipients of the Social Enterprise Summer Fellowship (SESF) program met with Tamer Center’s Ivy Hatsengate to discuss logistics and preparations for their summer internship. 

April ’22

April 29 — 2022 Climate Business + Investment Conference, Leadership on the Path to Net Zero
Avoiding catastrophic climate change will require a rapid and sustained reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. While more than 1,000 companies with combined revenue over $10 trillion have already pledged to reduce emissions to net zero, there is no clear path for effectively reaching this goal. The 2022 Climate Business & Investment Conference discussed net zero business strategies and their implications for climate change. Professor Costis Maglaras, dean of Columbia Business School gave welcome remarks. Speakers included Rich Lesser, global chair of Boston Consulting Group; Mark Gallogly ’86, co-founder of the Three Cairns Group; Marissa McGowan, chief sustainability officer of L'Oreal North America, Vanessa Burbano, Sidney Taurel Associate Professor of Business, Melissa Lott, senior research scholar and director of research at Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy; Shiva Rajgopal, Roy Bernard Kester and T.W. Byrnes Professor of Accounting and Auditing; Geoffrey Heal, Donald C. Waite III Professor of Social Enterprise; Nili Gilbert ’03, vice chairwoman of Carbon Direct; Julie Gosalvez, CMO of Climeworks; Ryan Orbuch, partner at Lowercarbon Capital; Gernot Wagner, visiting associate professor; Ethan Brown ’08, co-founder and CEO of Beyond Meat; and Professor Bruce Usher.
Organized by the center and Columbia Climate School. 
April 28 — Blockchain in the Humanitarian Sector
Cecilia Chapiro, 2022 Columbia University Obama Foundation Scholar and former investments lead at UNICEF's Venture Fund, led a discussion on her experience launching the UN's first CryptoFund, starting a blockchain cohort of investments, and the learnings through that process.
April 26 — Three Cairns Climate Fellowship Final Presentations
The Three Cairns Climate Fellowship provides support to MBA/EMBA students who complete semester- or year-long projects at the intersection of climate change and business. The fellowship was endowed by Lise Strickler ’86 and Mark Gallogly ’86. Each fellow presented their project to faculty and peers in the program, donors, client organizations, and community members.
April 26 — Nonprofit Board Leadership Program Project Presentations
NBLP mentees presented their projects to student leadership and a panel of expert judges. Finalist presentations included: Immigrant Justice Corps (IJC): John Hill ’23 and Gee Mi Jorde ’23; Tomorrow’s Leaders: Watson Leffel ’23 and Hudson Hoyle ’23; Uncommon Schools Camden Prep: Zach Fredman ’23 and Lucy Goldberg ’23; Qualitas: Emily Gemp ’23 and Yaneli Rubio ’23; Dancing Classrooms: Emily Serwer ’23 and Becca Richman ’23; Harlem Wellness Center: Brenna Sargent ’22 and Anke Ehlert ’23; and CIANA: Lucy Bian ’22 and Kathryn Benvenuti ’23. The projects were selected from a panel of judges that included: Adjunct professors Doug Bauer, executive director of Clark Foundation and Amy Houston, executive director of Thompson Family Foundation; and Sandi Drucker Wright, ’04TC, director at the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise. The final presentation winner(s) were: 1st Place - Tomorrow’s Leaders (Watson Leffel ’23 and Hudson Hoyle ’23); 2nd Place – Uncommon Schools Camden Prep (Zach Fredman ’23 and Lucy Goldberg ’23); and tied for 3rd Place – Immigrant Justice Corps (John Hill ’23 and Gee Mi Jorde ’23) and Dancing Classrooms (Emily Serwer ’23 and Becca Richman ’23).
Organized by the NBLP, under the auspices of the Social Enterprise Club (SEC) and center.
April 25 — Book Talk, Reclaiming Your Community: You Don't Have to Move Out of Your Neighborhood to Live in a Better One
How can we solve the problem of persistent poverty in low-status communities? Majora Carter argues that these areas need a talent-retention strategy, just like the ones companies have. Retaining homegrown talent is a critical part of creating a strong local economy that can resist gentrification. But too many people born in low-status communities measure their success by how far away they can move from these communities. In this book talk discussion, Majora discussed why she returned to the South Bronx and devised a development strategy rooted in the conviction that these communities have the resources within themselves to succeed. 
April 19 — Tamer Center for Social Enterprise Club Leadership Retreat
This annual retreat for leadership teams of the GBC, SEC — including the Financial Literacy Club (FLC), Microlumbia Impact Fund, Nonprofit Board Leadership Program, and Pangea Advisors — and center staff and faculty provides an opportunity to engage in open strategic discussions and to set goals for the upcoming academic year.
Organized by the center and club leaders from GBC, SEC, FLC, Microlumbia, NBLP, and Pangea Advisors.
April 15 — Columbia University’s 20th Annual Social Enterprise Conference, Capital for Good Digital Event Series
Two closing keynote sessions focused on economic inclusion and mobility in America. Kicking off the event, Deborah Dugan, strategist for social impact, interviewed Robert Rooks, chief executive officer of REFORM, in a session entitled “Reversing the Great Resignation: How Criminal Justice Reform Can Revitalize Our Economy and Reduce Intergenerational Poverty.” They discussed the mass incarceration crisis we see today in America, Robert’s career path in criminal justice reform as a grassroots organizer, and how REFORM is fostering economic opportunity by creating pathways to work and wellbeing for formerly incarcerated individuals and people with a criminal record. Moderator Jorge Guzman, Assistant Professor at Columbia Business School, interviewed Aron Betru ’06, chief strategic officer and chief operating officer at Trident, and senior fellow at Milken Institute, for a discussion on “Reimagining Private Equity and Small Business Investing: Providing Equitable Access to the American Dream.” Aron shared insights on his career path, diversity in asset management, Trident’s investment thesis on small businesses and minorities, and the community impact private equity has on local economic opportunity by growing local businesses.
Organized by the center, SEC, and GBC.
Throughout April 2022 — Social Impact Week, Cluster Auction Night
Students gathered within their clusters for community-building fundraising events where they auctioned off experiences based on their individual talents to their peers.
Organized by clusters and the SEC.
April 14 — Social Impact Week, Sustainability and Purpose: A Case Study From Ralph Lauren Fragrances
This panel brought together an array of voices on business strategy, sustainability, and philanthropy to discuss the growing expectations for firms to embed sustainability into their products and services. Panelists discussed the development and launch of Polo Earth by Ralph Lauren Fragrances, a case study which highlighted the opportunities, challenges, and ongoing work that will need to be done by businesses of all kinds. Panelists included: Alexandre Choueiri, global president, Ralph Lauren Fragrances, L'Oreal; Danielle Nkojo, sustainability lead, product and circularity, Ralph Lauren; Justin Welch, director of marketing, Firmenich; Dan Lambe, CEO, Arbor Day Foundation; and moderator Silvia Bellezza, Gantcher Associate Professor of Business in Marketing, Columbia Business School.
Organized by the Center on Global Brand Leadership, and a part of SEC’s Social Impact Week.
April 12 — Tamer Center for Social Enterprise 2022 Annual Reception
Students, alumni, faculty, and professionals in the social enterprise sector joined center staff and advisory board members for an evening of networking and socializing in Kravis Hall overlooking the Hudson River. Professor Dan Wang gave remarks on joining the center as the newly appointed co-director and his vision for inclusive entrepreneurship, formalized experiential learning and consulting projects for students, and engagement opportunities for partnerships with the School’s surrounding neighborhood. 
April 12 — Social Impact Week, An Introduction to Impact Investing with Professor Bruce Usher
Students joined SEC members for an introduction to impact investing session with Professor Bruce Usher. This lunch and learn provided an overview of the range of investing and funding approaches used by impact investors and explored the role of financial innovation in creating opportunities to finance social enterprises.
Organized by the SEC.
April 11 — Social Impact Week, Dinner at PS Kitchen
To kickoff the Social Enterprise Club’s Social Impact Week, club members gathered for a social dinner at PS Kitchen, founded by April Tam Smith ‘10. PS Kitchen is a social business and artisanal, plant-based restaurant committed to creating jobs for those marginalized in New York, such as clients of our partnering organizations; donating 100 percent of profits to sustainable charitable work locally and overseas; and providing New Yorkers with delicious food options that are kind to the body and the earth.
Organized by the SEC.
April 7 — Book Talk, Thoughts on People, Planet, & Profit
Author Amy Domini, founder and chair of Domini Impact Investments, discussed the secret to making an impact, ways to align your money with your values, and ways you can make a difference in the world. Her new book Thoughts on People, Planet, & Profit is a collection of essays about responsible investing from the field’s pioneers. It’s also a book about hope. Through short, thoughtful ruminations on everything from championing biodiversity to just saying “no” to war, Amy Domini demonstrates that when investors come together to care for the greater good, they can ensure both people and the planet continue to thrive. 
April 5 & April 9 — ReEntry Acceleration Program (REAP) Course Information Session
Past MBA and EMBA REAP instructors & advisors led info sessions to discuss the REAP courses, and their experiences in advising and teaching financial empowerment, getting to yes, and entrepreneurship to incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people.
April 1 — Columbia University’s 20th Annual Social Enterprise Conference, Capital for Good Digital Event Series
The development of affordable housing is an important part of developing successful communities. In New York City, developers and investors have a long record of partnering with local governments and NGOs to develop affordable housing. This panel brought together experts from multiple sectors to discuss prominent issues in public-private partnerships in real estate and community development. Panelists discussed their experience in partnership formation, project implementation, and financing with a focus on key success factors, pitfalls, and how to create value for all stakeholders. Panelists included: Annie Koo ’14, housing innovation at Catalyst Housing Group; Stephen Mott, chief strategy officer at HELP USA; Arden Sokolow, ’95GS, executive vice president of Affordable Housing at Douglaston Development; and moderator James Patchett, adjunct assistant professor at Columbia Business School
Organized by the center, SEC, and GBC.

March ’22

March 29 — Factuality Workshop
Led by Natalie Gillard, founder and facilitator of Factuality, students had the opportunity to take on a new identity as they walked through an interactive workshop simulation. During the simulation, participants were presented with fact-based societal advantages and limitations that coincide with various intersecting identities and respond to the prompt based on their character role. Factuality evokes empathy, increases cultural competence, and enhances self-awareness. Within this workshop, participants learned the intricacies of inequality’s intentionally structured foundation and its crippling cyclical nature; empowered them to be able to dismantle the various preconceived biases associated with various marginalized groups; and gave them the tools to leave the workshop self-aware and prepared to contribute to inclusive rhetoric regarding the dissolution of structural inequality.
March 24 — Columbia University’s 20th Annual Social Enterprise Conference, Capital for Good Digital Event Series
Throughout the evolution of SRI and ESG investing, institutional investors have focused on the 'E' (environmental) and 'G' (governance) factors which are arguably easier to define and quantify their impact and return on investment. However, the tide has changed. Large capital commitments from companies, institutional investors, and philanthropic donors have funded a movement towards elevating the 'S' (social) in ESG. In the “How Goldman Sachs Is Addressing the 'S' in ESG Investing” session, Asahi Pompey, ’97LAW, global head of corporate engagement at Goldman Sachs, discussed how she is deploying capital to level the playing field and spark economic growth for people and communities around the world. In conversation with Professor Dan Wang, Pompey discussed insights on how she is unlocking potential at the firm through catalytic capital investments in their community engagement programs: 10,000 Small Businesses, 10,000 Women, One Million Black Women, Goldman Sachs Gives, and Community TeamWorks. 
Organized by the center, SEC, and GBC.
March 3 — Catalyst Fund Presentation + Internship Info Session
Catalyst Fund aims to fill important gaps in the innovation ecosystems across emerging markets, including: lack of patient capital to test and iterate products in-market; lack of skill sets to rapidly build viable solutions for underserved customers; and lack of personal connections with global and local investors and corporate partners. The program tackles these challenges by offering a combination of catalytic grant capital, bespoke venture-building support from market and sector experts and access to a global network of investors and corporate innovators, while sharing insights, learnings and toolkits with the broader inclusive tech ecosystem. Students interested in the fund and internship opportunities joinined Shivani Kotecha, program administrator at Catalyst Fund, who provided insights into their portfolio and discussed summer internship opportunities.
Organized by Microlumbia Impact Fund, a part of the SEC.
March 2 — Using the Think Bigger Method to Find Innovative Climate Change Solutions
Business leaders are looking for that next great idea or innovation to address climate change and sustainability, but we often forget an important part: how? Where do our best ideas come from? Participants joined the center for a conversation with Professor Sheena Iyengar who touched on how innovation — whether that be as an environmental entrepreneur, within a business or field of discipline, or in our personal lives and how we impact the environment — begins with a creative spark and the tools that can be used to find your spark of innovation to address the global climate change crisis. Professor Iyengar shared insights on the Think Bigger Innovation Method and how it uses decision-making theory, cognitive science, and industry practice to facilitate creativity and innovation for complex problem solving that is both novel and useful. Whether a problem is related to social discourse, the transition to net zero, or supply chain sustainability and logistics, the Think Bigger Innovation Method fosters both interdisciplinary teamwork and constructive interactions that draw on every individual’s experience and expertise. The method focuses on defining and refining a problem, while learning to deconstruct and verbalize that problem to surface and reduce bias. It also privileges searching outside the self, going far beyond customer insight, and exploring the history of true innovation. At its heart, Think Bigger relies on structured persistence, multi-domain research, and combinatory experimentation.
March 1 — Student Startup Showcase and Innovation Lab Open House
Participants joined the centers at Columbia Business School’s Innovation Lab to learn about the new space that is dedicated to innovation and entrepreneurship. The event showcased student founders with participants listening to ideas, touching products or prototypes, and providing feedback to founders.
Organized by the Lang Center, Columbia-Harlem Small Business Development Center (SBDC), and Tamer Center for Social Enterprise.

February ’22

February 22 — Social Enterprise Alumni Career Panel + Breakout Sessions
First- and second-year students interested in social impact careers attended this panel discussion and breakout group networking conversations to learn about possible career paths in the social enterprise sector. Panelists shared their experience, career path, and insights about pursuing a career in impact investing, sustainability and green business, social enterprise consulting, government and public sector, and more! Speakers included Jill Bunting '16, deputy director at Coalition for Green Capital; Caitlin Gallagher ’20, head of growth at Local Civics; Diane LuTran ‘21, senior manager of strategic sustainability consulting at Ramboll and former IFC/The World Bank Consultant; and Cambyse Parsi ’13, director of sustainable finance at Scotiabank; in conversation with Mike De Lucia, at the Career Management Center at Columbia Business School.
Organized by the Career Management Center (CMC) and center.
February 22 — When Purpose Calls, You Answer: Defying The Odds Through Advocacy
We can only advocate for others when we can learn to advocate for ourselves. This topic teaches you how to stand boldly in what we are called to do. Jasmine Fain, CEO of ENPWR U, broke down how to stop running from the idea, skills, or calling you feel that you are supposed to be doing and provided attendees with processes to mentally, spiritually, and physically develop habits that allow you to grow into the leader you need to become to advocate for others.
February 18 — Columbia Student Climate Symposium
The symposium connected students working on diverse climate-related projects across the University, bringing together those with a common interest and commitment to developing solutions for the adaptation and mitigation of climate change. The event promoted interdisciplinary, University-wide collaboration around climate change research and solutions, and gathered feedback from students on how best to facilitate and connect student research related to climate across the University. The event featured an introductory keynote panel with faculty speakers from the Climate School, followed by breakout sessions tailored to students’ interests. 
Organized by the GBC, in partnership with the Columbia Climate School.
February 17 — TFSV Information Session
The Tamer Fund for Social Ventures provides seed grants of up to $25K to nonprofit, for-profit, and hybrid early-stage social and environmental ventures. Funding is made available to around seven ventures each year. This information session for Columbia University students and alumni is an opportunity to learn and ask questions about the fund, application process, upcoming deadlines, and qualifications to apply.
February 17 — Green Business Club Kickoff
Students interested in joining the club joined the board and club members at this informal gathering to learn more about the club, careers, and meet fellow members. 
Organized by the GBC.
February 17 — SESF Information Session
Students interested in working with an organization over the summer that creates social or environmental value joined Tamer Center advisor Ivy Hatsengate, and Timothy Lee, ’23BUS ’23SIPA, (US International Development Finance Corporation), Rebecca Manning ’22 (TechnoServe), and Romke Rozendaal ’22 (McKinsey) who shared information on their summer experiences. The Social Enterprise Summer Fellowship (SESF) program supports students engaged in summer internships with nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations (or its equivalent outside the US), NGOs, public sector/government organizations, and for-profit social ventures with a clearly defined social or environmental purpose incorporated into the core reason for operation, which is evident in both mission and practice. Fellows typically work on projects that focus on areas such as strategic planning, business plan development, marketing and product strategies, financial analysis, operational improvements, and performance evaluation; and in fields such as impact investing (including venture philanthropy and social venture capital), microfinance, social entrepreneurship, small- and medium-enterprise development, health care, education, community development, sustainability, the environment, and more. 
February 10 — Paths to a Sustainable Brand: The Rise of Resale and What it Means for the Future of Fashion and Other Industries
The secondhand market is expected to double from $36 billion to $77 billion by the year 2025, according to research conducted by Global Data. What’s driving this explosive growth? Resale is projected to grow 11 times faster than the overall apparel industry in that same time period. Retailers like Patagonia, Lululemon, Madewell, REI, Steve Madden, and more have used resale as their latest sustainability play, and the list is only growing. Panelists examined the opportunities and challenges that come with the biggest trend in retail, as well as ideas on how to make your brand more sustainable. Speakers included Victoria Beasley, general partner at Prelude Ventures; Catherine Clark ’20, senior product manager at ThredUp; Michele Levbarg-Klein Rayden ’22, business development manager at TheRealReal; Melissa Michelle MacKay ’13, head of supply chain at The RealReal; and Shiva Rajgopal, Professor at Columbia Business School. This session was moderated by Paige Carlotti ’23, marketing manager of UNTUCKit. 
Organized by Columbia Business School’s Alumni Club of New York and supported by the center.
February 10 — Tamer Center J-term Club Kickoff
The center and professional clubs provided information on the social enterprise community at the Business School. Students interested in exploring the field of social enterprise met students and faculty whose passion for international development, social entrepreneurship, ESG/CSR, impact investing, renewable energy, nonprofit consulting, and nonprofit management has elevated the School to be one of the top business schools for social enterprise. Students learned about the different club initiatives on campus and opportunities to be involved in the social enterprise community.
Organized by GBC, SEC, and the center.
February 3 — Hacking for Humanity and the Planet Venture Incubator Course Info Session and Team Building Mixer
Students from across Columbia’s schools and programs learned about the B8527 course and application process which fosters cross-campus access and collaboration to leverage Columbia talent and resources to build teams, and advance ventures to help gain investor interest. Following the info session, led by adjunct professor Joy Fairbanks ’94, participants networked with founders and team members to form interdisciplinary teams to apply for the course. 
February 3 — TFSV Information Session
The Tamer Fund for Social Ventures provides seed grants of up to $25K to nonprofit, for-profit, and hybrid early-stage social and environmental ventures. Funding is made available to around seven ventures each year. This information session for Columbia University students and alumni is an opportunity to learn and ask questions about the fund, application process, upcoming deadlines, and qualifications to apply.

December ’21

December 2 — TFSV Webinar Series, A Conversation with Mattan Griffel, Co-Founder and COO of Ophelia
Founders and leadership teams from health and wellness ventures in the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures (TFSV) portfolio met with adjunct professor Mattan Griffel to learn more about his experience and discuss current opportunities and strategies for health and wellness startups. Mattan is the co-founder and COO of Ophelia, a company that helps people quit opioids without having to go to rehab. Mattan is a two-time Y Combinator-backed entrepreneur. The discussion covered many topics, including engaging investors, how to leverage AI for health tech, and raising Series A funding. ​​

November ’21

November 30 — The Future of Sustainability in Food
Panelists Fanny Hansson, business development manager at Matsmart-Motatos; Clare Murray ’17, co-founder of Blume Equity; and Beth Stockli Kennedy, CEO and co-founder of Seconds, discussed how the food industry is becoming more sustainable. 
Organized by GBC and the Gourmet Club.
November 22 — Social Impact Careers Panel
SEC members interested in pursuing a career in social impact attended this session to hear from their peers about the different fields in social enterprise. Panelists included second-year students with experience working in social entrepreneurship, international development, nonprofit consulting, and sustainable finance sectors. 
Organized by the SEC.
November 19 — Columbia University’s 20th Annual Social Enterprise Conference, Capital for Good Digital Event Series
The conference provides a unique opportunity for attendees to tap into the vibrant ecosystem of capital for impact through the lens of philanthropy, impact investing, ESG, and social venture and business examples. In this session of the 2021-2022 Digital Event Series, attendees joined panelists for a discussion on “Misinformation, Extremism, and Business.” Anya Schiffrin, senior lecturer and director of the Technology, Media, and Communications at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, moderated a conversation on the rise of misinformation and the responsibility of social media and other online content companies in fighting misinformation and extremism. Panelists Antony Cousins, CEO of Factmata, and Gordon Crovitz, co-CEO of NewsGuard, shared insights on potential solutions to the misinformation problem, the evolution of misinformation through recent elections and the pandemic, and how the news and tech sectors can and have been working together. Following this session, conference attendees had access to a weekend film screening of In Her Shoes, a film by Cynthia Salzman Mondell, which explores the narratives of women in prison through the shoes they wear, have worn, and will one day wear. The film features a series of interviews with women participating in an art program inside the Dallas County Jail, where they reflect on their experiences as survivors of gender and state violence and consider how economic inequality, gender discrimination, and political disenfranchisement have shaped their lives.
Organized by the center, SEC, and GBC.
November 17 — Hacking for Humanity and the Planet Venture Incubator Course Info Session + Networking Mixer
Students from across Columbia’s schools and programs learned about the Social Venture Incubator [B8527] course, taught by adjunct professor Joy Fairbanks ’94, which fosters cross-campus access and collaboration to leverage Columbia talent and resources to build teams, access any necessary technology, advance ventures, and gain investor interest. Interested students, as well as alumni, faculty, and researchers working with student teams, learned about the application process for the course and what qualifies as an impact venture. Following the info session, participants networked with founders and team members to form interdisciplinary teams to participate in the course. 
November 5 — Columbia University’s 20th Annual Social Enterprise Conference, Capital for Good Keynote Kickoff
The conference provides a unique opportunity for attendees to tap into the vibrant ecosystem of capital for impact through the lens of philanthropy, impact investing, ESG, and social venture and business examples. Kicking off our 2021-2022 digital event series on “Impact Investing With Damien Dwin,” founder and chief executive officer of Lafayette Square, and moderator Antony Bugg-Levine, managing director and co-head of community impact at Lafayette Square, discussed what issues motivated Damien to pursue impact investing, how the industry is shifting focus from the “E” to the “S” in ESG, and how place plays an essential role in achieving positive outcomes for local communities. This keynote covered how Lafayette Square is using place-based impact investing and DEI as core investment and talent strategy. Damien shared his perspective on Vera Institute and the broader case for business leaders engaging in tackling the mass incarceration and employment crisis. In our second keynote session, “Investing for Change: The “Total Impact” Portfolio,” Liesel Pritzker Simmons, co-founder and principal of Blue Haven Initiative, shared insights on Blue Haven Initiative's catalytic capital investing approach and how they measure their impact. Audience members heard Liesel’s perspective on why an impact portfolio needs to be completely impact-focusted and the typical management and organizational challenges that ventures face in operating and scaling. This session was moderated by professor Bruce Usher
Organized by the center, SEC, and GBC.

October ’21

October 26 — Digital Finance for Climate Resilience: A Framework for Action Launch
Millions of people around the world are already experiencing the negative effects of climate change. Unfortunately, many exposed populations lack access to solutions and resources that can build resilience to the negative impacts of climate change. We believe digital finance can be a critical enabler in improving the affordability, accessibility, and reach of climate resilience solutions among vulnerable populations globally. We urgently need to scale innovations in “digital finance for climate resilience” and see the emergence of an innovation ecosystem as a critical first step. To understand the opportunity for digital finance and fintech to power greater climate resilience, BFA Global convened a task force of climate and financial service experts, including World Resources Institute, CGAP, PayPal, UNCDF’s Better Than Cash Alliance, and the team of the UN Race to Resilience campaign. Together, the task force developed a Digital Finance for Climate Resilience (DF4CR) Framework for Action, detailing the critical actions that must be taken to catalyze the emergence of an innovation ecosystem for DF4CR. Participants joined the DF4CR Task Force for a panel discussion on how to launch the Digital Finance for Climate Resilience Framework for Action.
Organized by BFA Global, where David del Ser ’08 is fintech director, and supported by the center.
October 25 — Social Enterprise Career Workshop
In this workshop, director Ivy Hatsengate hosted a live facilitation of a career workshop recording from Emily Lamia at Pivot Journeys. Students learned ways to help identify and define their future career in social enterprise; zero in on what they enjoy about work; clarify the skills they want to use in their next position; create a more refined ‘pitch’ to communicate their value and what they’re looking for; and nail potential interview questions. Ivy also discussed career resources available to students interested in pursuing a career in the social enterprise sector.
October 15 — NBLP Orientation
Students and partner organization staff and board members participating in the program gathered online for the program’s orientation session to learn about their nonprofit board projects for the academic year and to discuss initiatives and best practices.
Organized by NBLP, within the SEC, and center.
October 14 — Making Sense of Soaring Gas Prices With Anne-Sophie Corbeau
High gas prices are rippling throughout much of Europe and Asia. The spike has also driven up the price of coal and sent electricity prices for businesses and homeowners to record highs. As the winter approaches, governments are in a time crunch and meeting with stakeholders to develop emergency plans to address the severe risk of coal and gas shortages if the price surge continues. Anne-Sophie Corbeau, global research scholar at CGEP, broke down the latest on the crisis. Listen to Anne-Sophie Corbeau’a recent podcast on Columbia Energy Exchange. 
Organized by the Energy & Infrastructure Club and GBC.

September ’21

September 30 — Columbia Business School Loan Assistance Program Info Session
Managing director Sandra Navalli OAM '03, and the Office of Financial Aid hosted an informational session for students and alumni interested in applying for Columbia Business School’s Loan Assistance Program, which enables MBAs to take management and leadership positions in the public and nonprofit sectors, and with social ventures. The program is designed to help alleviate the financial burden associated with repaying education loans while pursuing a career in these sectors, which typically pay lower salaries but have unmet needs that Columbia Business School graduates are able to address.
September 30 — SESF Cross-campus Project Presentations
The center and the 2021 SESF cross-campus participants celebrated the current cohort of fellows. This networking event served as an opportunity for students to learn about the program first-hand from the center’s most recent cohort of fellows, listen to summer project presentations, and get to know social enterprise students from across Columbia University's campus. This year’s summer fellows interned across social enterprise sectors including international development, health care, arts, conservation, and beyond. Visit our summer fellows website to read about past summer experiences.
September 29 — Senior Leaders Program (SLP) Information Session Webinar
This program offers senior nonprofit executives the opportunity to gain strategic management and leadership skills and cutting-edge business knowledge to help them develop actionable plans for their organizations. Interested program participants learned about the program; gained a better understanding of how the program can benefit them, their staff, and their organization; gained insight into the program's content, hybrid in-person and virtual structure, main assignments, and program outcomes; learned about the application process and tuition assistance opportunities; and asked questions about the program experience and logistics.
September 28 — SESF MBA Project Presentations
The center and the 2021 SESF MBA participants celebrated the current cohort of fellows. This networking event served as an opportunity for interested students to learn about the program first-hand from the center’s most recent cohort of fellows, listen to summer project presentations, and get to know social enterprise students at the Business School. This year’s summer fellows interned across social enterprise sectors including education, health care, philanthropy, impact investing, sustainability, real estate, and beyond. Visit our summer fellows website to read about past summer experiences.
September 25 — JTC & REAP Advising Kickoff Session
REAP and JTC students and advisors gathered virtually for an introduction and orientation for the semester’s advising program. Students met their advisors at virtual tables and outlined their goals for working together for the duration of their program.  
Organized by Columbia University’s Justice Through Code (JTC) and the center.
September 23 — Nonprofit Board Leadership Program (NBLP) Information Session
Students interested in taking on an independent consulting project for a nonprofit learned more about the NBLP program, application process, and nonprofit board service.
Organized by NBLP, within the SEC, and center.
September 21 — Pangea 2021 Fall Kickoff
Students interested in participating in Pangea Advisors heard from club leadership about Pangea, Columbia Business School’s pro bono international consulting organization that strives to improve lives in the developing world by helping nonprofit and for-profit social enterprises address business challenges. Club leaders discussed how Pangea operates, its impact to date, a summary of our past projects, the opportunities for first-year students to join the board, and the potential for travel this year.
Organized by Pangea Advisors, within the SEC. 
September 21 — Three Cairns Climate Fellowship Information Session
At this information session, Reilly O’Hara, program manager, discussed upcoming deadlines for the fellowship and answered questions. The Three Cairns Climate Fellowship at Columbia Business School provides support to MBA and EMBA students who complete semester- or year-long projects at the intersection of climate change and business.
September 14 — Tamer Center Clubs Kickoff
The center and professional clubs provided information on the social enterprise community at the Business School. Students interested in exploring the field of social enterprise during their time at Columbia Business School had the opportunity to meet students and faculty whose passion for international development, social entrepreneurship, ESG/CSR, impact investing, renewable energy, nonprofit consulting, and nonprofit management has elevated the School to be one of the top business schools for social enterprise. Students learned about the different club initiatives on campus and opportunities to be involved in the social enterprise community.
Organized by the Green Business Club (GBC), (Social Enterprise Club) SEC, and center.
September 10 –12 — Columbia University’s Hacking for Humanity (H4H)
Hacking for Humanity at Columbia University harnesses the diverse talent and resources of the campus community and beyond to solve pressing global challenges affecting people and the planet. In just three days, students, alumni and researchers from across the campus formed interdisciplinary teams to design and develop innovative solutions to urgent problems, refined their ideas with advice from experienced mentors, and pitched their startups to expert judges. Venture teams developed valuable entrepreneurial experience, built professional relationships inside and outside the University, and competed to win both awards and prizes to further develop their ventures. In the inaugural year, our winning ventures were: 1st Place: Soluminos; 2nd Place: THIMBLE; 3rd Place: Moby; Top Environmental Venture: Soluminos; Top Health & Wellness Venture: THIMBLE; Top Social/Economic Inclusivity Venture: Opal; Best Undergraduate Venture: Pattern; and Crowd Favorite: Authentic Housing.
Organized by the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, in collaboration with Columbia Entrepreneurship, Columbia Technology Ventures, School of Engineering and Applied Science and School of Bio-Medical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, Columbia Data Science Institute, Columbia Climate School, The Earth Institute, Columbia World Projects, Brown Institute at Columbia School of Journalism, GSAAP, Mailman School of Public Health, SIPA, Columbia Law School, Global Columbia Collaboratory, student groups across campus, and more.
September 1 — Advancing Racial Equity (ARE) Info Session Webinar
The Advancing Racial Equity program provides participants with an in-depth understanding of the barriers that organizations face in increasing diversity and racial equity, offering a range of solutions and hands-on tools for eliminating these barriers and creating more inclusive organizations. Participants learned about the program and its live online learning format and content, met the faculty directors, and asked questions.

August ’21

August 18 & September 2 — Columbia University’s Hacking for Humanity (H4H) Team Formation & Mixer
Interested Hackathon participants joined adjunct professor Joy Fairbanks ’94 in this team formation and mixer event. Founders had an opportunity to pitch their venture ideas to an audience of interested Columbia University students and alumni. Following the pitches, founders had the opportunity to meet with interested participants and form interdisciplinary teams for the Hackathon event.
Organized by the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, in collaboration with Columbia Entrepreneurship, Columbia Technology Ventures, School of Engineering and Applied Science and School of Bio-Medical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, Columbia Data Science Institute, Columbia Climate School, The Earth Institute, Columbia World Projects, Brown Institute at Columbia School of Journalism, GSAAP, Mailman School of Public Health, SIPA, Columbia Law School, Global Columbia Collaboratory, student groups across campus, and more.

July ’21

July 14 — Columbia University’s Hacking for Humanity (H4H) Info Session
Is it possible to create a social impact startup in a weekend? Adjunct professor Joy Fairbanks ’94 welcomed interested participants to an info session about Columbia University’s Hacking for Humanity hackathon. Joy discussed how Hacking for Humanity harnesses the diverse talent and resources of the campus community and beyond to solve pressing global challenges affecting people and the planet. Attendees had the opportunity to ask questions, meet fellow participants, and form venture teams. These interdisciplinary teams use the weekend to design and develop innovative solutions to urgent social and environmental challenges, refine their ideas with advice from experienced mentors, and pitch their startups to expert judges. Read more about Hacking for Humanity at Columbia University here.
Organized by the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, in collaboration with Columbia Entrepreneurship, Columbia Technology Ventures, School of Engineering and Applied Science and School of Bio-Medical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, Columbia Data Science Institute, Columbia Climate School, The Earth Institute, Columbia World Projects, Brown Institute at Columbia School of Journalism, GSAAP, Mailman School of Public Health, SIPA, Columbia Law School, Global Columbia Collaboratory, student groups across campus, and more.
July 1 — Social Enterprise Summer Fellowship (SESF) Virtual Check-in Meeting
With much success in the summer, the center continued the monthly SESF virtual check-in meetings with the 2021 summer fellows cohort as a way to create a community for fellows to connect online. Fellows met each other online to discuss best practices for working remotely and learn what their peer social impact projects fellows were working on.